Nikon D700 con BatteryGrip MB-D10

Ebbene si! Ho avuto una botta di C**O e condizioni a me favorevoli, mi hanno portato “in mano” la Nikon D700, non ci posso ancora credere!!!! 😀

Qui di seguito la recensione tratta da Dpreview :

The introduction of Nikon’s new D700 may have been one of the worst kept secrets in an industry with more leaks than the Titanic, but it was still something of a surprise coming so hot on the heels of the D3 and D300. Essentially a D3 shrunk down and squeezed into a body roughly the same size as a D300, the D700 is Nikon’s first ‘compact’ professional SLR, and in its segment of the market will compete with the recently announced Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Sony DSLR-A900.

The imaging side of the D700 is pretty much the same as the D3; it shares the acclaimed 12.1MP full frame (‘FX’) sensor and has the same processing engine, so we would presume output to be almost identical. The main differences (aside from being considerably smaller) are physical; there’s a different shutter (good for 150,000 exposures rather than 300,000 on the D3), different viewfinder prism (with 95% coverage) and a slower burst rate. You also lose the rear LCD info panel (there’s no room for it) and one of the D3’s two CF card slots, but you do get a couple of extra features to soften the blow slightly; most notably a self-cleaning sensor and a built-in flash. We’ll look a little more in-depth at the differences between the D3 and D700 in a moment.

The D700 joins the D3 as a fully-fledged ‘professional’ model; it has the same tank-like build quality (though we’re sure the pop-up flash will cause a few raised eyebrows), and gets you the full pro service from Nikon. And the pricing (around $2999) reflects this; anyone hoping for an ‘affordable’ semi-pro full frame Nikon SLR will have to wait until the cost of producing such large sensors falls considerably.

Nikon D700 Key Features

  • 12.1 megapixel full-frame sensor (8.45µm pixel pitch)
  • Image Sensor Cleaning (vibration) *
  • ISO 200 – 6400 (with boost up to ISO 25600 and down to ISO 100)
  • Also supports DX lenses, viewfinder automatically masks (5.1 megapixels with DX lens)
  • 14-bit A/D conversion, 12 channel readout
  • Same ultra-fast startup and shutter lag as D3
  • Nikon EXPEED image processor (Capture NX processing and NR algorithms, lower power)
  • New Kevlar / carbon fibre composite shutter with 150,000 exposure durability *
  • Multi-CAM3500FX Auto Focus sensor (51-point, 15 cross-type, more vertical coverage)
  • Auto-focus tracking by color (using information from 1005-pixel AE sensor)
  • 95% coverage, 0.72x magnification viewfinder *
  • Auto-focus calibration (fine-tuning), fixed body or up to 20 separate lens settings
  • Scene Recognition System (uses AE sensor, AF sensor)
  • Picture Control image parameter presets
  • 5 frames per second continuous with auto-focus tracking*
  • Optional MB-D10 Battery Pack (same as D300), increases burst rate to 8 fps *
  • UDMA compatible single CF card slot *
  • 3.0″ 922,000 pixel LCD monitor
  • Live View with either phase detect (mirror up/down) or contrast detect Auto Focus
  • Virtual horizon indicates if camera is level (like an aircraft cockpit display)
  • HDMI HD video output
  • ‘Active D-Lighting’ (adjusts metering as well as applying D-Lighting curve)
  • Detailed ‘Control Panel’ type display on LCD monitor, changes color in darkness
  • Magnesium alloy body with connections and buttons sealed against moisture
  • Improved Info display on main screen *
Nikon D700 con Battery Grip MB-D10

Nikon D700 con Battery Grip MB-D10

Body material Magnesium alloy
Sensor • 36 x 23.9 mm CMOS sensor
• FX format
• RGB Color Filter Array
• Built-in fixed low-pass filter
• 12.87 million total pixels
• 12.1 million effective pixels
• 3:2 aspect ratio
Image processor Nikon EXPEED
A/D conversion 14 bit
Image sizes
(FX format)
• 4256 x 2832 [L; 12.1 MP]
• 3184 x 2120 [M; 6.8 MP]
• 2128 x 1416 [S; 3.0 MP]
Image sizes
(DX format)
• 2784 x 1848 [L; 5.1 MP]
• 2080 x 1384 [M; 2.9 MP]
• 1392 x 920 [S; 1.3 MP]]
File formats • NEF (12-bit or 14-bit, compressed or lossless compressed RAW)
• NEF + JPEG
• TIFF
• JPEG (EXIF 2.21)
Lens mount • Nikon F mount with AF coupling and AF contacts
• No field of view crop (full-frame)
• When using DX lenses / DX mode 1.5x FOV crop
Usable lenses • DX AF Nikkor: All functions supported
• Type G or D AF Nikkor: All functions supported (PC Micro-Nikkors do not support some functions)
• Other AF Nikkor: All functions supported except 3D Color Matrix Metering II. Lenses for F3AF not supported. IX Nikkor lenses not supported.
• AI-P Nikkor: All functions supported except autofocus and 3D Color Matrix Metering II
• Non-CPU AI Nikkor: Can be used in exposure modes A and M; electronic rangefinder can be used if maximum aperture is f/5.6 or faster; Color Matrix Metering and aperture value display supported if user provides lens data
Auto Focus • 51 focus points (15 cross-type sensors)
• Multi-CAM 3500FX
• AF working range: -1 to +19 EV (ISO 100, normal temperature)
• AF fine tuning possible
• Contrast Detect in Live View (Tripod) mode
Lens Servo • Single Servo AF [S]
• Continuous Servo AF [C]
• Manual focus [M]
• Focus Tracking automatically activated by subject’s status in [S] or [C] AF
Focus Point • Single point from 51 or 11 focus points
• Liveview (Tripod mode): Contrast AF on a desired point anywhere within frame
AF Area Mode • Single point AF
• Dynamic Area AF [9 points, 21 points, 51 points, 51 points (3D-tracking)]
• Automatic-area AF
Focus Lock Focus can be locked by pressing shutter-release button halfway (single-servo AF) or by pressing AE-L/AF-L button
AF assist AF-assist illuminator (range approx. 0.5-3 m/1.6-9.8 ft.)
Exposure modes • Program Auto [P] with flexible program
• Shutter-Priority Auto [S]
• Aperture-Priority Auto [A]
• Manual [M]
Metering TTL full-aperture exposure metering using 1005-pixel RGB sensor
• 3D Color Matrix Metering II (type G and D lenses); color matrix metering II (other CPU lenses); color matrix metering (non-CPU lenses if user provides lens data; metering performed)
• Center-weighted: Weight of 75% given to 8, 15, or 20 mm dia. circle in center of frame or weighting based on average of entire frame
• Spot: Meters approx. 4 mm dia. circle (about 1.5% of frame) centered on selected focus point (on center focus point when non-CPU lens is used)
Metering range • 3D Color Matrix Metering: 0 to 20 EV
• Center-Weighted Metering: 0 to 20 EV
• Spot Metering: 2 to 20 EV
• At normal temperature (20°C/68°F), ISO 100 equivalent, f/1.4 lens
Meter coupling CPU and AI
Exposure lock Locked using AE-L/AF-L button
Exposure bracketing • 2 to 9 frames
• 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 or 1 EV steps
Exposure compen. • +/-5.0 EV
• 1/3, 1/2 or 1 EV steps
Sensitivity • Default: ISO 200 – 6400 in 1/3, 1/2 or 1.0 EV steps
• Boost: 100 – 12800 in 1/3, 1/2 or 1.0 EV steps, HI2 = ISO 25600
Shutter • Electronically-controlled vertical-travel focal plane shutter
• 30 to 1/8000 sec (1/3, 1/2 or 1.0 EV steps)
• Flash X-Sync: 1/250 sec
• Bulb
DOF Preview • Stop-down lens aperture by pressing button
• Activates modeling flash
White balance • Auto (1005-pixel CCD, image sensor)
• Presets (seven) with fine tuning
• Manual presets (five)
• Color temperature in Kelvin (2500 – 10000 K)
• White balance bracketing (2 to 9 frames in increments of 1, 2 or 3
Picture Control • Standard
• Neutral
• Vivid
• Monochrome
Image parameters • Sharpening: Auto, 10 levels
• Contrast: Auto, 6 levels, Custom tone curve
• Brightness: 3 levels
• Saturation: Auto, 7 levels
• Hue: 7 levels
Color space • sRGB
• Adobe RGB
Viewfinder • Optical-type fixed eye-level pentaprism
• Built-in diopter adjustment (-3 to +1m-1)
• Eyepoint: 18 mm (at -1.0m-1)
• Focusing screen: Type B BriteView Clear Matte VI screen
• Frame coverage 95%
• Viewfinder magnification approx 0.72x with 50 mm f/1.4 lens
Focusing screen • B-type BrightView Clear Matte IV Screen
• Superimposed focus brackets
• On-demand grid lines
LCD monitor • 3.0 ” TFT LCD
• Approx. 920,000 pixels (VGA; 640 x 480 x 3 colors)
• 170° viewing angle
100% frame coverage
• Brightness adjustment
LCD Liveview • Handheld mode: TLL phase-detect AF with 51 focus areas (15 cross-type sensors)
• Tripod mode: focal-plane contrast AF on a desired point within a specific area
Shooting modes • Single frame
• Continuous Low [CL]: 1 – 5 fps (1 – 7 fps with Battery Grip)
• Continuous High [CH]: 5 fps (8 fps with Battery Grip)
• Liveview [LV]
• Self-Timer (programmable)
• Mirror-up mode
Self-timer • 2 to 20 sec custom
Flash • Manual pop-up type
• Guide number of 17/56 (ISO 200, m/ft.) or 12/39 (ISO 100, m/ft.)
Flash control • TTL flash control with 1,005-pixel RGB sensor; i-TTL balanced fill-flash and standard i-TTL fill-flash available with SB-900, 800, 600 or 400
• Auto aperture (AA): Available with SB-900, 800 and CPU lens
• Non-TTL auto (A): Available with SB-900, 800, 28, 27 or 22s
• Distance-priority manual (GN): Available with SB-900, 800
Flash Sync Mode • Front-curtain Sync (normal)
• Red-Eye Reduction
• Red-Eye Reduction with Slow Sync
• Slow Sync
• Rear-curtain Sync
Flash Accessory Shoe ISO 518 standard-type hot shoe contact; Safety lock mechanism provided
Flash Sync Terminal ISO 519 standard terminal, lock screw provided
Flash compensation • -3 to +1 EV
• 1/3, 1/2 or 1 EV steps
Creative Lighting System With Speedlights such as SB-900, SB-800, SB-600, SB-R200, or SU-800 (commander only), supports Advanced Wireless Lighting, Auto FP High-Speed Sync, Flash Color Information Communication, modeling flash and FV lock; built-in flash can be used as a commander
Orientation sensor Tags images with camera orientation
Playback mode • Full frame
• Thumbnail (4 or 9 images)
• Zoom
• Slideshow
• RGB histogram
• Shooting data
• Highlight point
• Auto image rotation
• image comment (up to 36 characters)
Languages • Chinese (Simplified and Traditional)
• Dutch
• English
• Finnish
• French
• German
• Italian
• Japanese
• Korean
• Polish
• Portuguese
• Russian
• Spanish
• Swedish
Connectivity • USB 2.0 (Hi-Speed) Mini-B connector
• HDMI video out (version 1.3a, Type C mini connector provided)
• Remote control 10-pin terminal
• PC Sync flash terminal
10-pin terminal • GPS: NMEA 0183 (Ver. 2.01 and 3.01) interface standard supported with 9-pin D-sub cable and GPS Cable MC-35 (optional)
• Remote control: via 10-pin terminal
Storage • Compact Flash (Type I only)
• UDMA supported
• 36 characters of text can be input and stored in EXIF header
Power • Lithium-Ion EN-EL3e
• Included dual battery charger MH-18a
• Optional AC adapter EH-5a/EH-5
• Optional Battery Pack MB-D10
Dimensions Approx. 147 x 123 x 77 mm/5.8 x 4.8 x 3.0 in.
Weight (no batt) Approx. 995 g/2.19 lb.
Operating environment Temperature: 0 – 40 °C / 32 – 104 °F, Humidity: under 85% (no condensation)
Box contents Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL3e, Quick Charger MH-18a, USB Cable UC-E4, Video Cable EG-D100, Camera Strap AN-D700, Body Cap BF-1A, Accessory Shoe Cover BS-1, LCD Monitor Cover BM-9, Software Suite CD-ROM (Supplied accessories may differ depending on country or area)
Optional accessories Wireless Transmitter WT-4, Magnifying Eyepiece DK-17M, AC Adapter EH-5a, Capture NX 2 Software, Camera Control Pro 2 Software, Image Authentication Software

Conclusion – Pros

  • Class-leading high ISO performance, usable up to ISO 12800
  • Clean, artifact-free low ISO output with good resolution and detail
  • Well-balanced noise reduction; more chroma NR, less luminance NR (film-like grain)
  • Very fast (instant power-up, short shutter lag and short viewfinder black-out)
  • Excellent continuous shooting capabilities (even more so with optional battery grip)
  • Massive dynamic range headroom in 14bit RAW files
  • Compatible with DX lenses with auto crop mode (only 5.1MP, however)
  • Large, bright viewfinder (although small by the standards of the class)
  • Good build quality, weather-sealed
  • Highly configurable Auto ISO function (can set maximum ISO and minimum shutter speed)
  • Effective chromatic aberration reduction (JPEG, RAWs through Capture NX)
  • Fast and accurate 51 point auto-focus even in low light
  • Auto-focus fine-tuning by body or per lens
  • Reliable metering
  • Powerful built-in flash with reliable metering and exposure
  • Large and bright high resolution LCD (delivers full-color VGA; 640xRGB x 480)
  • Live view with up to 1:1 pixel view (excellent for manual focusing)
  • HDMI video output (up to 1080i)
  • Clearly arranged and intuitive menu system
  • Clever features from built in tilt sensor to help system, Active D-Lighting, Overlay, Multiple exposures an intervalometer
  • Highly customizable (custom functions, FUNC button)
  • Comprehensive range of image parameters
  • Very comprehensive battery information display (% charge, shots, aging)
  • Integrated sensor cleaning
  • Effective vignetting correction

Conclusion – Cons

  • Lower resolution than the competition (the price you pay for brilliant high ISO performance)
  • Very steep default tone curve can lead to clipped highlights in JPEGs
  • Unreliable auto white balance in artificial light

Overall conclusion

When we reviewed Nikon’s first full-frame DSLR, the D3, in April this year we said it was ‘possibly the most compelling, capable and well-rounded professional digital SLR ever made.’ Only three months later Nikon announced another full-frame camera with the D700. The new model’s ‘compact’ dimensions and much more affordable price tag make it a more appealing proposition than the D3 to many professional photographers and serious amateurs alike but can it keep up the high standards that have been set by its bigger brother?

There is no doubt the answer to this question is yes. Considering the cost advantage over the D3 (almost $1700 at the time of writing) the difference in specification between the two cameras is surprisingly small. You get a larger, truly pro-grade body, faster continuous shooting and a slightly bigger viewfinder with the D3 but if these things aren’t too high up on your priority list you should definitely take the D700 into consideration. On top of the saving you also get a built-in flash (certainly useful for some) and integrated sensor cleaning. Specification is one thing though and image quality and performance are another. Luckily though the D700 is on a similar level as the D3 in these areas as well.

Unsurprisingly the D700 produces excellent output that is very similar to the D3’s. At low sensitivities the D700’s image results are very clean, virtually noise- and artifact-free and look pleasantly ‘unprocessed’. If you prefer a crisper, more consumer-friendly look to your images there’s more than enough latitude for fine-tuning the sharpness, contrast and saturation settings – either in-camera or in post processing. Having said that, the D700’s default tone curve is steeper in the highlights than its bigger brother’s which can lead to clipped highlights. You can keep this under control by adjusting the default settings but if you want to get the maximum out of the camera your best bet is, as usual, shooting RAW. The D700 offers an enormous, almost five stop RAW headroom that allows you to even pull back highlight detail that has been blown out beyond recognition.

The D700’s most obvious strength though is its high ISO performance (which again is very similar to the D3’s). It’s the combination of the huge photosites on the full frame sensor and Nikon’s very sensible approach to noise reduction (heavy-handed on chroma noise and much more lenient on luminance noise) that lets you (within limits) take usable pictures up to a sensitivity of ISO 12800. The ISO 25600 setting might be a slightly dubious compromise in terms of image quality but at the very least you can keep shooting at minimum light levels. At the time of writing the D3 and the recently announced Canon 5D Mk II are the only other cameras on the market offering such extreme ISO settings. However, the image quality of the latter is still an unknown at this point in time.

Speed wise the D700 is as good as it gets in this class of camera. Read/write and buffer times, shutter lag and power on are excellent and even the 5 frames per second continuous shooting should be good enough for most applications. If you use the optional battery grip with the big EN-EL 4a or AA batteries you can even push it up to 8 frames per second – pretty close to D3 performance (you don’t get a speed advantage by shooting in DX mode though).

Let’s have a look at the cons then and as you might guess from looking at the list above this will be a fairly short paragraph. The first thing that springs to mind is the D700’s 12 megapixel resolution. If this is good enough for your purposes you will only be able to decide yourself but it’s a fact that the competition in the shape of the Canon 5D Mark II and Sony DSLR-A900 offers almost double the amount of sensor resolution – at a similar price point (with the Canon you also get HD video on top). However, the lower resolution is the price you pay for the D700’s staggering speed and high ISO performance – you can’t have everything in life.

While a lack of resolution could be a potential deal-breaker for some the slightly unreliable auto white balance performance in artificial light probably isn’t. Nor is the steep tone curve that we’ve mentioned above. Simply use custom white balance and change the default settings or – even better – shoot RAW to work around these minor issues.

In conclusion the Nikon D700 is an excellent camera that is extremely versatile and performs well both in the studio and on location. No doubt it sets a benchmark in the ‘compact’ pro bracket of the market. For how long remains to be seen. We will know more after we’ve reviewed the Canon 5D Mark II and the Sony DSLR-A900.

Detail (D-SLR)
Rating (out of 10)
Build quality 9.0
Ergonomics & handling 9.5
Features 9.5
Image quality 9.5
Performance (speed) 9.5
Value 9.0

Highly Recommended!!!

Non mi resta che augurarvi BUONA LUCE!!!!! 🙂

Annunci

~ di Massimiliano Tessaris su sabato 12 giugno, 2010.

5 Risposte to “Nikon D700 con BatteryGrip MB-D10”

  1. Ma in mano nel senso che ora è tua??? questa macchina è quella che hanno i fotogiornalisti!!!

  2. Si, si, nel senso che ora la possiedo. 🙂 E’ stato un affare, ed ovviamente è usata, ma devo dire, è magnifica! 🙂

  3. Sweet website, I had not noticed tesmabetri.wordpress.com before during my searches!
    Continue the great work!

  4. Thank you m8!

  5. Thanks for your helpful Post, I hope you have a good day!. 🙂

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